The $300,000 dinner at Bangkok’s Lebua Hotel

The 10-course feast is being touted as a “once-in-a-lifetime inspirational dinner.” On April 5, Bangkok’s five-star Lebua hotel will treat 50 favored guests to a repast prepared by a glittering array of Michelin-starred chefs. To thank the guests for their loyalty to the hotel, Lebua plans to spend $300,000 for the meal. Accustomed though they may be to showy p.r. …

Bespoke Chocolates

Imagine being given free creative rein in England’s most exclusive chocolate factory, one that uses the latest equipment and specializes only in top-end ingredients. It’s a fantasy come true for any chocolate connoisseur — and the man who can make it happen is Bill McCarrick, master chocolatier at Sir Hans Sloane Chocolate House in Surrey. The newest player in the …

Luxury Instant Noodles – Harrods Posh Pot Noodle

Famous UK department store Harrods has launched a luxury Pot Noodle – the Posh Noodle sells for £29.95 with all the proceeds going to charity. To add to the exclusivity, only a limited quantity of 100 are made. The vegetarian-friendly posh noodle comes in a hand-flocked and gold-leafed pot. It also comes with a fork and table linen. Source : …

The Most Expensive Coffee Machine in the World

This bling encrusted Nespresso Crystal Coffee Machine from Goldstriker International must be a contender. Features include: • Encrusted with 3100 original Swarovski crystals complete in the colour crystal • Width: 22.6 cm depth: 23 cm height: 23 cm • Weight: 4,50 kg Power: 1260 Watts • Cup warmer in aluminum • Removable grill for the preparation of Latte Macchiato It …

Restaurant table with built-in 3D LCD screen

Have you ever been to a restaurant serving exotic foods and felt lost while ordering from the list of strange dishes spelt before you on the menu card? A few days back, we were talking about Conceptic, an Israeli start-up company that installed the e-menu options in pubs, their popular sushi bars and the family restaurants. Now, TEC Japan has …

Restaurants try e-menus

delicious food

Restaurants in Europe, the United States and Japan are testing technology to let diners order their food direct from a screen at their table instead of depending on a fellow human being to note their choice – sometimes grumpily or erroneously. Besides cutting costs, companies that sell the “e-menu” argue the bytes-for-bites approach has a novelty value that can lure …